Pet Euthanasia Information

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Google Maps location for Humanimals

Humanimals
44 Rankeilor Street
Dunedin South
New Zealand 9012

Phone:
03 456 2345
Making the decision to euthanize a beloved family pet is never easy; indeed, it may be one of the hardest decision you have to make.  Knowing when is the “right time” is especially difficult, and there is no simple answer. Veterinary staff can advise regarding medical conditions and pain assessment and the like. You, the owner may be the best judge of quality of life. You know your pet best but some questions to ask yourself:
Is your pet eating and drinking as normal (more or less?)
Does your pet exercise as much as previously? (all pets, like people slow down as they age)
Does your pet have difficulty getting up from bed?
Is your pet still actively interacting with you? For example, does your dog wag their tail as much as previously? Do they still greet you with enthusiasm when you come home?  Do they enjoy going for a walk or has that walk narrowed down to a garden stroll only? Does your cat still enjoy being stroked as before?  Do they still like to go outside?
A number of owners put off the decision because they are unsure of the process. Here we hope to put your mind at ease…
The hardest part is making the decision - with that decision made, often comes resolution and a sense of relief.
Other things to consider:
Would you prefer a home visit or to bring your pet to the clinic?
What to do with your pet afterwards? Options include home burial, cremation with ashes returned or cremation without the ashes being returned.
Is there an opportunity for family members to say goodbye, take a last photograph, take a lock of hair, a paw print, a shared final ice cream or similar treat?
Whether the euthanasia takes place at home or at the clinic, the process is similar. Your pet can be given a sedative by injection, either just under the skin or into a muscle. Once they are settled, the area over the vein in the front leg is shaved and swabbed in preparation. An intravenous catheter may be placed and secured in place with tape whilst your pet is held by a veterinary nurse. Throughout this process you can be with your pet and reassure them and say your goodbyes. The veterinarian will then check with you that you are ready, only then will they start injecting. The drug is a specially concentrated form of anaesthetic designed to quickly overpower the brain, senses and stop the heart. It works within 30 seconds and your pet quickly passes from conscious to unconscious to deceased.  We can leave you with your pet for however long you wish to have a final pat.
Cremation and ash return usually takes approximately 10 days. You can have the ashes returned in a wooden box or ceramic urn, or others choose to select a box of their own and move them from the cardboard box they are returned in.
If you have any questions about this topic or any other, please don’t hesitate to ask our staff.

Making the decision to euthanize a beloved family pet is never easy; indeed, it may be one of the hardest decision you have to make. Knowing when is the “right time” is especially difficult, and there is no simple answer. Veterinary staff can advise regarding medical conditions and pain assessment and the like. You, the owner may be the best judge of quality of life. You know your pet best but some questions to ask yourself:

  • Is your pet eating and drinking as normal (more or less?)
  • Does your pet exercise as much as previously? (all pets, like people slow down as they age)
  • Does your pet have difficulty getting up from bed?
  • Is your pet still actively interacting with you? For example, does your dog wag their tail as much as previously? Do they still greet you with enthusiasm when you come home? Do they enjoy going for a walk or has that walk narrowed down to a garden stroll only? Does your cat still enjoy being stroked as before? Do they still like to go outside?

A number of owners put off the decision because they are unsure of the process. Here we hope to put your mind at ease…

The hardest part is making the decision - with that decision made, often comes resolution and a sense of relief.

Other things to consider:

 Would you prefer a home visit or to bring your pet to the clinic?

  • What to do with your pet afterwards? Options include home burial, cremation with ashes returned or cremation without the ashes being returned.
  • Is there an opportunity for family members to say goodbye, take a last photograph, take a lock of hair, a paw print, a shared final ice cream or similar treat?

Whether the euthanasia takes place at home or at the clinic, the process is similar. Your pet can be given a sedative by injection, either just under the skin or into a muscle. Once they are settled, the area over the vein in the front leg is shaved and swabbed in preparation. An intravenous catheter may be placed and secured in place with tape whilst your pet is held by a veterinary nurse. Throughout this process you can be with your pet and reassure them and say your goodbyes. The veterinarian will then check with you that you are ready, only then will they start injecting. The drug is a specially concentrated form of anaesthetic designed to quickly overpower the brain, senses and stop the heart. It works within 30 seconds and your pet quickly passes from conscious to unconscious to deceased. We can leave you with your pet for however long you wish to have a final pat.

Cremation and ash return usually takes approximately 10 days. You can have the ashes returned in a wooden box or ceramic urn, or others choose to select a box of their own and move them from the cardboard box they are returned in.

If you have any questions about this topic or any other, please don’t hesitate to ask our staff.